Biblitz delivers advise

ASK Biblitz about Drinking.

What Jeeves inserts in these specials of his I have never ascertained, but their morale-building force is extraordinary. They wake the sleeping tiger in a chap.


Cheers, dear reader! Join Biblitz for a couple of quick ones, won't you?

moet-Biblitz WodehouseCocktails

P.G. Wodehouse

An Illustrated Biography

With Complete Bibliography and Collector's Guide Hardcover

Lovingly produced by Joseph Connolly

A relaxed Plum and a reflective Ethel toast each other with Dry Martinis on the terrace of their Long Island home. (From Chapter Eleven, The Old Reliable, pgs. 124-125).

Sermons and Soda-Water

A Three-Volume Set

Hardcover

By John O'Hara

... We had come to our maturity and our knowledgeability during the long decade of cynicism that was usually dismissed as "a cynical disregard of the law of the land," but that was something else, something deeper. The law had been passed with a "noble" but nevertheless cynical disregard of men's right to drink. It was a law that had been imposed on some who took pleasure in drinking by some who did not. And when the law was an instant failure, it was not admitted to be a failure by those who had imposed it. They fought to retain the law in spite of its immediate failure and its proliferating corruption, and they fought as hard as they would have for a law that had been an immediate success. They gained no recruits to their own way; they had only deserters, who were not brave deserters but furtive ones; there was no honest mutiny but only grumbling and small disobediences. And we grew up listening to the grumbling, watching the small disobediences; laughing along when the grumbling was intentionally funny, imitating the small disobediences in other ways besides the customs of drinking. It was not only a cynical disregard for a law of the land; the law was eventually changed. Prohibition, the zealots' attempt to force total abstinence on a temperate nation, made liars of a hundred million men and cheats of their children; the West Point cadets who cheated in examinations, the basketball players who connived with gamblers, the thousands of uncaught cheats in the high schools and colleges. We had grown up and away from our earlier esteem of God and country and valor, and had matured at a moment when riches were vanishing for reasons that we could not understand. We were the losing, not the lost, generation. (From Imagine Kissing Pete, pgs. 28-29)

ASK Biblitz how to make a classic dry martini, straight up, with a twist:

Assemble ingredients - ice cubes, dry vermouth, lemon, lemon zester, jigger, strainer and, of course, gin.

Ice a martini glass.

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice cubes almost but not quite to the brim, rejoicing in the pleasant jingling.

Fill the iced martini glass with about 2-1/2 jiggers of gin with an extra splash for the cook.

Give the open bottle of vermouth a light slosh in a circle over the ice cubes, then take up the shaker and circle gently so as not to bruise the gin, again allowing the musical ice cubes to regale you.

Apply the strainer over the martini glass, leaving only the very thinnest film of vermouth atop the gin, casting the rest into a receptacle for cook's use later on, perhaps in the poaching of a fish of some kind.

Zest a curl of lemon and float it gently atop the vermouth film. Watch it sink enigmatically as you sip.

bitterBeerNarrow

You Get So Alone At Times That It Just Makes Sense

Paperback

By Charles Bukowski, the old sinner!

bumming with Jane

there wasn't a stove
and we put cans of beans
in hot water in the sink
to heat them
up
and we read the Sunday papers
on Monday
after digging them out of the
trash cans
but somehow we managed
money for wine
and the
rent
and the money came off
the streets
out of hock shops
out of nowhere
and all that mattered
was the next
bottle
and we drank and sang
and fought
were in and out
of drunk
tanks
car crashes
hospitals
we barricaded ourselves
against the
police
and the other roomers
hated
us
and the desk clerk
of the hotel
feared
us
and it went on
and
on
and it was one of the
most wonderful times
of my life.

(-- pgs. 44-45)

prohibitionNarrow

I wouldn't try it, sir. You have only to ask John O'Hara what happened the last time America buckled under ham-fisted Prohibition!

Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit

Paperback

By P.G. Wodehouse

You know how it is when two strong men live in close juxtaposition, if juxtaposition is the word I want. Differences arise. Wills clash. Bones of contention pop up and start turning handsprings. No one was more keenly alive than I to the fact that one such bone was scheduled to make its debut the instant I swam into his ken, and mere martinis, I felt, despite their numerous merits, would not be enough to see me through the ordeal that confronted me.

It was in quite fairly tense mood that I dried and clothed the person, and while it would perhaps be too much to say that as I entered the sitting-room some quarter of an hour later I was a-twitter, I was unquestionably conscious of a certain jumpiness. When Jeeves came in with the shaker, I dived at it like a seal going after a slice of fish and drained a quick one, scarcely pausing to say 'Skin off your nose.'

The effect was magical. That apprehensive feeling left me, to be succeeded by a quiet sense of power. I cannot put it better than by saying that, as the fire coursed through my veins,

tigerNarrow

Wooster the timid fawn became in a flash Wooster the man of iron will, ready for anything. What Jeeves inserts in these specials of his I have never ascertained, but their morale-building force is extraordinary. They wake the sleeping tiger in a chap. ... (-- pgs. 13-14)